GameStop: Expensive Bundles "More Convenient"

Game News: GameStop: Expensive Bundles "More Convenient"

When a Nintendo system is hard to find, you can count on retailers to get more available... in the form of over-priced bundles with other stuff you don't want. Now, GameStop is defending that practice, claiming that it's "more convenient" for you to spend more money on the system. Right...

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Comments (3)

  • Galm666 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold ODST

    2 months ago

    Do any of these bundles save you money as opposed to buying everything on their own? I don't think I would see it as big of a problem if you saved a few bucks while still getting everything you were going to get any way. Bundles also make good for presents, parents buying kids a console with a few games already in it might look appealing to a lot of people. Just playing devil's advocate her. 

  • Shmittles FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    2 months ago

    It's stupid situation that's Nintendo's fault to begin with (albiet not their problem in this context). I really don't care that businesses decided to play the business game like they're supposed to, but pretending that it's for the customers' benifit is just asinine.

  • EricHVela FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Eric Hohoho! Vela

    2 months ago

    GameStop: Named because they Stop you from playing Games.

    Wal-Mart: Named because they Wall off their... I got nothing, but it's annoying.


    To be fair, Rolling Stone's Glixel likely put GameStop on the spot with a question about bundles and they had to say something, and the truth wouldn't go over any better than the marketing other than admitting that they don't really care about the customers and declining to answer would be seen as an admission (even though a non-answer is really just that -- a non-answer). Kinda mean thing to do as we already know the true answer, and it's just asking someone to either admit it at the cost of customers or lie at the cost of customers -- darned if you do or don't. Then again, it's difficult to say what Glixel asked and what was freely offered without prompting when they don't publish the questions.