New Game+ #20

Glitch Please: New Game+ #20

Our suggestions for the best games to play for October spooky time. And what's the best route to getting a good gaming PC? Buying or Building?

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Comments (14)

  • kylebelerin FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    3 weeks ago

    Would love to see a PC build vid from you guys, I just built my own a few months ago but it would be great to see what I could have done differently/what I can still improve on, specifically my cable management is a nightmare. 

  • UnspokenKibs FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    4 weeks ago

    Ryan talking about PCs sounds like an animal trainer talking about a vicious breed of dog. "Don't let it know you're scared. It can smell fear."

  • AishaAdventures FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Yomiko Readman's twin

    4 weeks ago

    Until Dawn was such a good game. And I scare easily so it messed me up for a few days. But the story and the art were just great. Also, f*ck Emily (character)! Just a "prank" my ass. (still salty)


    That Assassins Creed Origins mode seems pretty neat for grins and giggles.


    YES, PLEASE have a PC build episode! That would be so cool. 

  • Advent1013 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Advent1013

    1 month ago

    (One consideration with a prebuilt PC is also that they sell ads to offset the cost, annoying, but could be cheaper in certain cases, not always, but it can be)

  • DarienSwartz FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    I work at a repair shop, the number of people with custom built PC's with simple issues is rather high. I don't recommend building your own unless you can troubleshoot it yourself. Repair shops are expensive, even just for diagnosis.

  • GreyGhost9036 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Angry Beaver

    1 month ago

    Honestly if anyone wants to build their own PC, of of the best places to go that i know of is reddit. Theres literally an area where you can give people your budget and someone will find a pc in your price range case and all. Keyboard and monitor may not be involved unless you ask. ALSO youtube. there are sooooo many videos online on how to build a PC. Trust me building a PC is really as hard as making something with legos. Its a fun experience and something that should be experienced by all because that feeling of accomplishment really is unique.  I would totally be up for a PC building anything. I find them to be so interesting and everyone always has their own unique tip.

  • Shmittles FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    I would really be interested in a PC-building special including not only the assembly, but also the process of selecting the parts to begin with (maybe looking the online-listed specs of 2 or 3 options for each part and highlighting what you're looking for and why). If that all seems like too much for one video, maybe a mini-series would work.


    I've never built my own PC before. Closest thing I've done is opened mine up to replace the Hard Drive after it died on me after about 3 years of use. I usually turn my PC off every night. For my new HDD, I specifically bought an Enterprise version since my PC's usually on for 16+ hrs a day (I usually work from home). Little distinctions like that might be worth talking about (even if the validity of one version over another, like Enterprise HDDs, is sometimes brought into question).

  • farson135 FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    I am surprised that Adam didn't mention the Souls/Borne games. The way to get good horror in a video game is by creating a sense of weakness in the player. 


    Souls/Borne games are not horror per se, but they create this feeling of unease, and powerlessness. Every new area brings a fresh horror, that can come from anywhere. In fact, there is a monster known as a "Creature of Avarice", that gave me the greatest jump scare I have ever had. 


    Combined with that, is the uncanny feeling that comes from every NPC you meet. One of the things you notice, talking to NPCs, is that almost every single one of them ends their sentences with a laugh. 


    In addition, the environmental design is incredible. The moment I stepped into the upper reaches of Blighttown, I felt like I had stepped into a world ruled by madmen. 


    I am going to end this by saying, if anyone is interested in Dark Souls, the hype around the game's difficulty is exaggerated. It is very easy to die in the Souls/Borne games, but survival mostly depends on paying attention, rather than reflexes. See that elevator covered in blood? Gee, I wonder what will happen if you get on it? Maybe find a different way around. 

  • hockeydaniel FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    I'm slowly acquiring parts for my first build, and I'd love to see a how to assemble a computer episode. I would even watch a full short series in going through the steps and tips in how to pick the parts just to get their opinions on the process.

  • OniZonda FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold Hokage

    1 month ago

    For anyone that's looking into PC gaming, here's my simple tip: A good mix of price and quality for PC gaming is to buy an off the shelf computer for ~$300 that has moderately respectable specs and dropping in a decent graphics card for $250 or so and you have a much more powerful rig than either console for pretty much the same price. It may not be a generally accepted practice but if you just want to have a computer that can play games, this would be the easiest solution to balance the two points since it's basically a compromise between building your own and buying one that's premade. Obviously there are a couple generic issues to be aware of when using this method, but it's probably going to be one of the cheapest ways to get a computer that can stand up to a custom machine.


    If you can find a computer that has 3.3GHz or faster multicore CPU, 8-16GB of RAM, and a hard drive that's big enough (generally 600GB-1TB is plenty) and then you put in a 2GB (or 4GB) graphics card, you've got a very powerful machine that can handle just about any game. Load times will vary depending on your hard drive but if you're new to the platform, you probably won't notice how much of a difference there is between a "standard" hard drive (what most computers come with) and a high RPM or Solid State hard drive. 

  • mrb0ston

    1 month ago

    TBH, right now bc of gpu pricing prebuilts are about equal in value, especially when talking about AMD graphics cards. I'd recommend a boutique builder like cyberpower or ibuypower as they tend to stick to cases that don't have proprietary form factors, making upgrades easier.


    And I would love to see some pc centric content on the know. With how everyone on the show is into it, It'd be great content. I really wanted to see video of Alfredo helping Michael buld his pc, maybe you guys could do that series with Mica as the pc newb? She's mentioned before she was intimidated by it so I think it would be good for the audience for someone like her to follow the seasoned vets instructions on how to build a proper pc.

  • fundin FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    As someone who doesn't have a lot of computer guy friends, I'd really like to see a 'Get to Know Your PC' clip/series of clips with tips on how your PC works and how to improve on it eg. overclocking, basic upgrade tips, which cable/plugs to switch out and apps and programs to lookout for etc.

  • Ekutah FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold

    1 month ago

    Put together my own PC when I was 16. Lots of googling 'how do i build a computer?'. Quadruple checked my parts were all compatible and then checked again. I spent a few hours putting it together. Dropped a few parts because of clumsiness. When it turned on and everything worked, it was the best feeling ever. I highly recommend it.


    It's nice because when it starts to perform badly, you can swap out parts, or even scrap most of it and build another one reusing some parts that are still okay.

  • EricHVela FIRST Member Star(s) Indication of membership status - One star is a FIRST member, two stars is Double Gold doesn't get breaks.

    1 month ago

    First PC I made: 486, 66 MHz, 4 MB of "Extended Memory" (now it's just all called RAM) with a MIDI interface for the Roland CM-64 and my digital piano. A 5.25" and 3.5" floppy disk drive, both High Density. I don't remember the video card or size of the hard disk.


    ... specifically built for Sierra and Origin Systems games of the day (as they required "LIM-Standard Expanded Memory", but you could allocate portions of Extended Memory as Expanded Memory and load executables and resident things into the higher RAM to leave room for programs that couldn't use the higher memory addresses - the different between Expanded and Extended was that Expanded could only hold data and Extended was able to execute code directly in it).


    Eventually added a CD-ROM for the later FMV-heavy Sierra and Origin games. Eventually upgraded the video to a 3Dfx Voodoo3 for Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire.


    The previous computer: Intel 8088 4.77MHz no extra RAM (64KB), 20MB hard drive (added later, required a card that also kept the time accurate between boots), two 5.25" Double Density drives. It was an IBM-PC Rev.B (aka 5150). Also, it was the first PC. (Previously, TI-99/4a PC/Console hybrid.)


    Continued to build PCs from scratch until around 10 years ago and decided to just get a packaged deal from Dell. This latest Dell has had only one modificaton: The video.


    It seems that the only thing that improves performance these days is the video. The CPU and RAM speed? Not so much. A little, but not worth the expense for the gain. SSDs decrease load (and boot) times by leaps and bounds, but if there is a fault, it's usually catastrophic (like a drive crash instead of a bad sector). They're also expensive. Super speed with more expense and risk. To be fair, the risk of bad sectors and SSD failures are both way down.


    For audio, that's personal preference. There was a time that you had to have a Creative Lab's SoundBlaster (then each iteration thereafter as they added features and games wanted to use them). Now, the integrated audio can be fine or just get a fiber connection to an external dedicated audio system.


    For VR, you'll need something equivalent of better to the GeForce GTX 970 (including AMD's ATI).


    Otherwise for video, SLI/Crossfire is a small risk: The application must be able to tolerate it as it's a different method of rendering - extra work for developers if they target it. Some video cards have multiple GPUs configured in SLI/Crossfire on one board (like the nVidia Titan). It's possible that half of your video card will go unused in some applications, but it takes only one video slot instead of multiple video slots, so it's not like you're wasting a whole slot for a game that won't tolerate multi-GPU rendering. One would think that the more modern games would most likely be multi-GPU tolerant, but it seems that there are tolerant "3D-Accelerated" games all throughout the history as well as singe-GPU-only games even these days.


    Personal preference: Intel and nVidia typically require fewer patches and fixes than AMD/ATI, but when someone's sponsored by AMD, you can bet that you'll get far better performance on the ATI and possibly even glitches on nVidia.


    So far, I haven't had a need for any special environmental requirements (liquid cooling and whatnot), but not everyone has the open space or keeps their house as cold as my partner. *shivers*


    Battery. You need a UPS that will hold your system (monitor, too - don't forget that) long enough for you to save, quit, and proper shutdown. Hard shutdowns are hard on a system.